Kindle Fire HD Reviews from Actual Users

Kindle Fire HD Reviews from Actual Users are showing up at Amazon. Kindle Fire HD is getting very mixed reviews.

Maurine (TarzanPhan) will be adding her Kindle Fire HD thoughts and review in the near future. After getting my Kindle Fire HD (by Monday hopefully) my Kindle Fire HD review and thoughts will be up too. For now, let’s look at ACTUAL Kindle Fire HD owner reviews.

Kindle Fire HD Reviews – Statistics and Thoughts

This is as of 10:03 pm on September 15th, 2012.

  1. 5 star reviews – 62 out of 146. That’s 42.47%.
  2. 4 star reviews – 29 out of 146. That’s 19.86%. So 62.33% (approximately 3 out of 5) Kindle Fire HD owners give it 4 stars or 5 stars. This is lower than for Kindle Fire 1 and the eInk Kindles.
  3. 3 star reviews – 17 out of 146. That’s 11.64%.
  4. 2 star reviews – 16 out of 146. That’s 10.96%.
  5. 1 star reviews – 22 out of 146. That’s 15.07%. 37.67% (approximately 2 out of 5) Kindle Fire HD owners are unhappy with it.

That’s a surprise to me.

2 out of 5 Kindle Fire HD owners being unhappy is really high. Assumption (hopefully a reasonable one): A user giving a 3-star review or lower for a $199 Kindle Fire HD is unhappy.

It’s even more of a surprise given that Amazon is selling a device with really good technical specifications at a cut-throat price.

Kindle Fire HD Reviews – The Negatives

Please Note: The most frequent issues are in Bold.

The negatives according to the 1-star review Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. No Flash Support. This is very strange. Wasn’t the whole point of getting a non iOS Device that things like Flash worked? Lots of complaints – especially since Kindle Fire 1 supported Flash. No Flash means lots of things like BBC Radio iPlayer don’t work and lots of websites don’t work.
  2. Annoying Ads Everywhere. The verdict is clear – Everyone hates the ads. They are everywhere and they are annoying. Quite a few people had no idea ‘Special Offers’ were included. Very disingenuous of Amazon not to mention it straight off.
  3. Recommendations = Amazon Ads. If you Pay to remove Ads – You still see Amazon recommending their Books and Movies. Lots of people upset that there are ads for Amazon content everywhere.
  4. Wireless Issues. Multiple people getting wireless issues.
  5. Freezing and Shutting Down Issues. Multiple people getting this.
  6. No Adapter included. This really is a strange and stupid decision. Lots of people upset about it.
  7. Amazon’s Carousel interface is still a pain. The Shelves is removed and instead you get recommendations of what else you can buy from Amazon. Lots and lots of complains about this.
  8. Facebook App not loaded by default. What a strange decision.
  9. Auto-Correct does not work in Silk Browser. They really need to name it something else. Perhaps ‘Cursed Black Widow Browser’.
  10. Camera can only be used for Skype. Note: This might change with time (or not).
  11. Favorites Shelves removed and replaced with Ads (for Amazon content).
  12. Email App not very good.
  13. Screensaver no longer has clock – only Ads.
  14. No indicator light to tell charging is complete.
  15. Wider than before and Kindle Fire 1 cases no longer fit.
  16. Silk Browser is slow.
  17. No GPS.
  18. [Update: Seems this is a wrong complaint and Text To Speech is actually present] No Text to Speech. This was from a handicapped person. I thought Kindle Fire 1 did not have Text to Speech either. So perhaps he moved to Kindle Fire HD from an eInk Kindle.

The negatives according to 2-star reviews from Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. Horribly Intrusive Ads. Everyone hates the Ads – going as far as calling them ‘entrapment’.
  2. Ads disguised as Recommendations. Below the Carousel are Ads disguised as ‘Recommendations Feature’. It takes a special type of stupidity to replace the one useful part of the home screen (the Favorites Shelves) with Recommendations to Buy Stuff. These Ads are NOT REMOVED even after paying the $15.
  3. No Flash. This seems to be a Top 3 complaint (along with Ads and Recommendations being Ads and being everywhere).
  4. Cluttered Screen due to all the recommendations and ‘other customers bought’.
  5. Erratic Touch Screen. Multiple people got this. Very frequent complaint.
  6. Software is Terrible. Lots of people having problems with the software.
  7. Pure Content Consumption Device with No Personalization.
  8. Email App is not very good.
  9. Hanging and Delays. Constantly Freezes. This issue doesn’t seem to be very common but there are enough instances to make this a big issue.
  10. No Facebook App.
  11. No YouTube App.
  12. WiFi problems accessing the Internet.
  13. ‘Busy’ Interface.
  14. Buttons are really hard to see. Have to find them by feel.
  15. Screen can’t be resized while watching movies. 2.35 aspect ratio is small.
  16. Lack of a Charger. Again, lots of complaints about this.
  17. You end up accidentally buying stuff. What other customers bought = Stuff you can buy from Amazon.
  18. No Calibre Support (supposedly). Kindle Fire HD uses MPT so it doesn’t show up as a device in Calibre on Mac. Not sure what any of that means but Mac users might make a note. Update: Other people also reported not being able to use Calibre with it.
  19. Apps which worked on old Kindle Fire crash or freeze the new Kindle Fire HD.

The negatives according to 3-star reviews from Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. Recommendations = Ads. Half of everything you see is trying to sell you on something else. Primary aim seems to be to expose users to things to buy. Recommendations = Super Annoying Salesman in Your Hand.
  2. Software is Poor.
  3. App Store filled with mediocrity.
  4. No Flash Player.
  5. No Charger.
  6. Does not support charge and play while connected to a PC.
  7. Apps that worked on Kindle Fire 1 sometimes don’t work on Kindle Fire 2. This really is a big goof-up by Amazon.
  8. Lots of stuttering and lag.
  9. No Folders or Collections.
  10. WiFi problems.
  11. No YouTube.
  12. Kindle Free Time – Only arrives next month.
  13. Stunted Google Support.
  14. Amazon Walled App Store.
  15. Non customizable interface.
  16. No way to search Lending Library.
  17. Very Few Apps available.
  18. HDMI movies did not play well on a 46″ LCD TV. Worse than Netflix quality (on same TV).
  19. GameLoft Apps purchased for Kindle Fire do not work on Kindle Fire HD. Ditto for lots of other apps.
  20. LED flashlight syndrome – whatever that means.
  21. Freezes while watching prime content.
  22. Reading books – average battery life of just 4 to 6 hours. This was based on just one user’s experience.

Negatives according to 4-star reviews from real Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. Really Annoying Ads.
  2. ‘Customers Also Bought’ is very Annoying. Ads are everywhere.
  3. Bad Software.
  4. Processor speed is not very good. Nexus 7 is better. Note: Interesting since Amazon claimed they have a much faster Processor and Graphics Processor.
  5. Too Much Marketing.
  6. Good but not Great.
  7. Noticeable Lag.
  8. Have to search for hardware buttons.
  9. Black bars when watching movies.
  10. No micro-HDMI cable.
  11. User Interface is Unintuitive in the beginning.
  12. The Power and Volume buttons are hard to find.
  13. The Operating System is limited in some aspects.
  14. No GPS.
  15. Poor multi-tasking abilities.
  16. Can only import up to 250 songs to the Cloud.
  17. No Dropbox Support.
  18. Size is bigger. Won’t fit in some jeans pockets like Kindle Fire 1 did.

It’s getting really late here so leaving out the 5-star reviews. I think the reviews we’ve covered so far cover all the pros and cons and paint a pretty accurate picture of Kindle Fire HD’s strengths and weaknesses.

Kindle Fire HD Reviews – The Positives

Positives according to 1-star reviews from Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. Great Hardware. Beautiful screen. Excellent Audio. Lots of people praise the hardware and pan the software and the ads.

Positives according to 2-star reviews from Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. Screen is Gorgeous. Stunning Clarity. Almost everyone loves the screen.
  2. Great Sound. Dolby Quality Sound. Lots and lots of praise for the sound.
  3. Solidly Built.
  4. Device is Great. 5 Stars.
  5. Looks and Feels Great.
  6. Browser is Fast.
  7. Anti-Glare screen is really nice.
  8. Movies stream over WiFi without buffering.
  9. WiFi works well.
  10. Fast Internet.
  11. Nice Keyboard.
  12. HDMI out is great.

Positives according to 3-star reviews from Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. Speakers are pretty nice – best sound on a device (portable device). Awesome Speakers. Sound Quality is very good.
  2. Great Screen. Crisp and Bright display. Video Quality is very good. Photo quality is very good.
  3. Easy use of Amazon content.

Positives according to 4-star reviews from Kindle Fire HD owners -

  1. Great Screen. Crisp. Rich Resolution. Not as good as Retina Display but better than iPad 2 (that’s what users say). Screen is truly vibrant.
  2. Sound – best on a Tablet so far. Sound of speakers is remarkable. Great Speakers. Even better than some laptop speakers.
  3. Better Software. Please Note: This sentiment was NOT shared at all by any of the Kindle Fire HD owners who gave it less than 4-stars.
  4. Ease of Use.
  5. FreeTime feature. Note: Not available yet.
  6. Built well and seems good for kids (because of its sturdiness).
  7. Glare is greatly reduced by the Anti-Glare screen.
  8. Improved Battery Life over Kindle Fire 1.
  9. Reading App has lots of features like Text to Voice, X-Ray, and Reading Immersion.

Again, leaving out the 5-star reviews since it’s really late here.

Kindle Fire HD Review Summary – Kindle Fire HD Reviews from Actual Owners

Kindle Fire HD Top 10 Pros

  1. Brilliant Screen.
  2. Great Speakers – best of any mobile device. Amazing Sound.
  3. Low Price of $199. Good value for money.
  4. Great for consuming Amazon content.
  5. Great at delivering content – that same ‘content consumption’ theme. Kindle Fire HD seems to be completely optimizing for buying and consuming content.
  6. Easy to Use. Lots of non-technical users mentioning this.
  7. Good Battery Life. Most users found the battery life good.
  8. Good new additions – Bluetooth, HDMI-out, front-facing camera, microphone.
  9. WiFi, for most people, is fast (fast download speeds).

Would have included FreeTime feature if it were already present. Lots of people excited about this feature – it isn’t available yet.

Please Note: There seem to be an equal number of people claiming ‘great responsiveness’ and ‘laggy and buggy’. A handful claim both i.e. very fast but lots of bugs. So not adding performance as a Pro.

Kindle Fire HD Top 10 Cons

  1. Ads are VERY annoying.
  2. Recommendations are just Ads for Amazon products. And they are everywhere.
  3. Software is Terrible.
  4. No Flash Support. Please Note: You can sideload Dolphin browser for full Flash Support.
  5. No Wall Plug.
  6. Browser is not good. It’s also slow. Very, very common complaint.
  7. Limited Range of Apps (even more limited than Kindle Fire 1). Apps that work on Kindle Fire 1 sometimes don’t work on Kindle Fire 2.
  8. Facebook and YouTube Apps not loaded by default. Hard to find.
  9. Email App is not very good.
  10. Erratic Touch Screen (not as wide-spread as above issues but a big issue if you get it).
  11. Difficulty to leave Amazon’s ecosystem. You can sideload apps but it’s not convenient and some things just aren’t possible.
  12. No MicroSD port.
  13. Camera can only be used for Skype at the moment. No rear-facing camera. Update: Camera works from the Facebook App.
  14. Extremely easy to make purchases. Listing as a negative because most users considered this either a negative or both a positive and a negative.

There are other problems too. You can look at the lists above to see which you might consider deal breakers.

My Thoughts after reading the Kindle Fire HD Reviews from Actual Users

The software seems shoddy and hastily put together. The hardware seems amazing. The Screen and the Speakers come in for some very high praise. The Ads seem like a big deal breaker if you don’t like Ads (the Ads seem particularly annoying and seem to be everywhere). The Recommendations feature just seems to be another set of Ads (and one you can’t turn off).

Kindle Fire HD does seem very easy to use and very fast (though you might be part of the 30% of Kindle Fire HD owners that seem to suffer from lagging and freezes).

Amazon really needs to do the following -

  1. Remove the ‘Buy This! Buy That!’ Ads disguised as Recommendations. I am dreading seeing this when my Kindle Fire HD gets here.
  2. Put a CLEAR, BIG notice on the Kindle Fire HD pages specifying that Ads come with the device and it costs $15 to remove them.
  3. Include a Charger. A wall plug can’t be more than $3 or $4 to Amazon (including the slightly higher shipping and packaging costs). A wall charger really should be included.
  4. Devote a team to improving the software. Enough of the 2-pizza nonsense. Get a proper software team working on this and make the software flawless (or close).

I found it sad that Amazon didn’t mention Ads in the Conference and that Ads aren’t mentioned CLEARLY on the Kindle Fire product page.

Unfortunately, it gets even worse. On top of Ads you have Ads for Amazon disguised as ‘Recommendations’.

The other really big flaw is the software being ‘absolutely awful’. Lots and lots of love for the hardware and nothing but complaints about the software. Lack of Flash and Lack of the Adapter are also big issues. Silk still being slow is another big issue. The Email App is supposed to be bad too. That’s another problem.

There seem to be way too many problems for a shipped product. Will Amazon’s goodwill with its customers give it breathing room? From the current Kindle Fire HD reviews it seems that users are willing to give Amazon some time to fix all the software issues.

Amazon is selling Amazon Mini-Stores

Amazon is hoping that people are OK buying an Amazon Kiosk/Mini-Store that also happens to be great for consuming the content you can buy at Amazon.

The current 3.5 star rating for Kindle Fire HD shows that this is upsetting some people. At the same time 62% of people gave Kindle Fire HD 4 stars or 5 stars. That suggests that a LOT of people are OK buying an Amazon Mini-Store – provided it is also great for consuming all the content they can buy at Amazon.

The Lack of Honesty about Ads is disconcerting

Here’s a very succinct 2-star review from Jack that captures my thoughts almost exactly -

$15 to remove ads when I spent $200+ on the kindle alone? And you are not going to include a wall plug? That will teach me not to rely on the quality of the first product.

My wife’s fire came with a wall plug and didn’t have ads pop up every single time I try to unlock it. The device is great but if this is the kind of cheap tricks it takes to make it look cheaper than it is this is the last one we get. Not going to pay $15 especially when it wasn’t even listed. In other words it’s something that the heads of Amazon knew would be an issue so they didn’t advertise that they would charge you extra after the fact. Cheap tricks.

Take the ads off and I’ll give it 5 stars. I can somewhat get past the wall charger but I’m sure not everybody has an extra usb adapter. Bottom line don’t do this. You have an awesome product. Don’t go the way of Apple relying on the name for people to overlook cut corners.

Amazon could save itself and customers a lot of trouble if it were Honest and Upfront about – Lack of Flash, Lack of Charger, Presence of Ads, Presence of ‘Recommendation Ads’ everywhere.

The software issues seem to be the result of Amazon rushing things and those can be fixed. However, the other things Amazon should be upfront about (ideally it should fix those issues too).

Kindle Fire HD doesn’t really deserve to win the Tablet Wars

I do trust customer reviews and these Kindle Fire HD reviews from real customers seem to show that Amazon isn’t really participating in the Tablet Wars. Its chances of winning the Tablet Wars are low and it probably doesn’t care.

Amazon is selling Amazon Mini-Stores that are also great for consuming content bought from Amazon. It’s an Amazon Kindle eReader + Amazon Movie Watcher + Amazon Music Listener + Amazon Shopping Kiosk. Amazon isn’t really selling Tablets.

It was foolish to think that Kindle Fire HD would somehow magically be a $350 Tablet sold at $199. What Amazon is selling is a Subsidized Amazon Mini-Store that is GREAT for consuming content bought at Amazon. It’s also GREAT for buying things from Amazon. If that’s what you’re looking for (An Amazon Consumption+Buying Device that’s easy to use), then Kindle Fire HD is incomparable. If you’re looking for a Tablet that does more – wait for Nook Tablet 2 and iPad Mini and Google Nexus 7 3G.

25 Responses

  1. Things are not looking good. After reading this, I am contemplating the possibility that I may end up canceling my order for the 8.9″ 4G. The bit about replacing favorites with ads is really upsetting. This could ultimately change my opinion of Amazon. I almost feel “taken.”

    Thanks for the report. I appreciate the time it takes to do what you do.

    • You’re welcome Bev. You can always cancel anytime. Perhaps Amazon does an update. Might as well wait and see what iPad Mini and Nook Tablet 2 and Microsoft Surface bring to the Table.

  2. I suspected no flash support after adobe’s decisions. But the favorites under the carousel is the only part of the UI that works. Removing that was a mistake.

    Also the recommendation makes it unusable in the educational market.

  3. scottus
    1. Press the star at bottom right. That brings up Favorites. You can add all you want to Favorites. It obliterates the ‘Recommendations’ when you click on it. And they’ll be seen under the Carousel.

    The Favorites also act as a type of task switcher.

    2. Good point re the educational market, but it’s easy to switch those off for that segment.

    Customers at Amazon want lowest prices and one way is a trade-off — less fixed cash demanded and a gamble you might want to buy enough to make it possible for them to handle hardware, software that syncs with every device under the sun with different workings (Apple syncs with Apple only), data that’s kept and sync’d for each person, databases galore that respond at the click of a button, stronger WiFi reported by several columnists who bothered to test the strength of it. All that is part of the cost.

    Remember, the vaunted $200 Nexus has 8 gigs of storage, not 16, a screen that does not have the brightness/contrast quality (said in several reviews — the Kindle Fire HD somewhat readable in sunlight) of the KFHD, and it has one mono speaker.

    Is a tablet an entertainment device for all kinds of media? Books, video, music, apps? Or is it just apps? Sound is really important in a portable device. SOME of us don’t want to go around or even sit around with earplugs or earphones or have to attach a portable device to speakers.

    Again, Favorites is there with a click of the Star that is always at the right bottom. Fill it up.

    TIP: Use it in Landscape. Recommendations almost never come up that way. An alternate way not to see them. I hope Amazon cuts WAY back on that though.

    Or, find other tablets that will give the range of entertainment and quality of sight and sound and interconnectivity and sync’g and just pay more cash for it.

    The Apple iPad gets Amazon Instant Prime now and they can be heros for not having ads which with their margins makes sense. It’s a choice. But Apple syncs with Apple and with no other companies’ devices. Yet, they call Amazon ‘closed’…

    • Andrys, thanks for the clarification about Favorites. And that would be pretty cool if it turns out to be an actual task switcher, remembering what you were doing in the previous app instead of simply closing it and opening anew when you switch back to it.

      • Bev, yes, everytime I see a web page or app page I want to get back to, I of course do the normal bookmarking (for web stuff) and then I press Home icon (always the left-most or bottom icon depending on orientation of the device) to get back to Home page. There, the carousel will show me Most Recent, which is the last page I was on.

        I long-press it to ‘Add to Favorites’ and it does. Then I click on that new Faves icon later from almost anything I’m doing (the Star is everywhere) and it takes me to the page I saved.

        For Apps it takes me to most recent page I accessed while using the app. But it gets me to and fro very nicely.

        The best thing is Favorites overwrites the area for use for ‘Recommendations.’

        One problem with the reviews-site is Amazon leaves reviews up that merely say “NO FLASH!” (though some of us warned about that for days, explaining Adobe stopped the mobile-device support as of last file and Nexus doesn’t support it either now).
        For that, the device gets dunned to a ’1′ too much. Or, there was a crash, but memory probs abound even with the Nexus, and a utility called AndroidAssist (I think) will monitor the memory-use and dump some as you go to help prevent overload when we’re doing multiple tabs in browsers like Dolphin (which Amazon allows us to install).

        Also, the 20-sec reboot gets rid of most problems and the talk forums are filled with gratitude for that info from other users who recommend it. The 24/7 help is no small thing, and Amazon’s smart about that use of users :-)

        I do love the eyeglasses ‘article view’ giving us ad-less, more readable views of the text of an article, but we can also double-click the article in web-view to make it more readable while it wraps as well.

    • Not quite sure what you mean by “Apple syncs only with Apple” but I sync between my Kindle Keyboard and the Kindle app on my iPad every day.

      • Straker, ‘Apple syncs only to Apple’ meant that Apple’s own books, etc., are sync’d only with other Apple devices.

        The sync’ing you’re seeing is done by Amazon servers w/ agreement by Apple, who benefits from it because people see it as an Apple function.

        Kindle apps work with all kinds of other vendors’ devices and so are useable on them and not only on Amazon devices though some press mistakenly propage the myth that you can read Amazon books only on Amazon devices.

        So you’d get the book from Amazon if you want it readable and syncable on, say, a Samsung phone or a Nexus tablet..

      • Typo: ‘propage’ was supposed to be ‘propogate’

  4. scottus
    1. Press the star at bottom right. That brings up Favorites. You can add all you want to Favorites. It obliterates the \’Recommendations\’ when you click on it. And they\’ll be seen under the Carousel.

    The Favorites also act as a type of task switcher.

    2. Good point re the educational market, but it\’s easy to switch those off for that segment.

    Customers at Amazon want lowest prices and one way is a trade-off — less fixed cash demanded and a gamble you might want to buy enough to make it possible for them to handle hardware, software that syncs with every device under the sun with different workings (Apple syncs with Apple only), data that\’s kept and sync\’d for each person, databases galore that respond at the click of a button, stronger WiFi reported by several columnists who bothered to test the strength of it. All that is part of the cost.

    Remember, the vaunted $200 Nexus has 8 gigs of storage, not 16, a screen that does not have the brightness/contrast quality (said in several reviews — the Kindle Fire HD somewhat readable in sunlight) of the KFHD, and it has one mono speaker.

    Is a tablet an entertainment device for all kinds of media? Books, video, music, apps? Or is it just apps? Sound is really important in a portable device. SOME of us don\’t want to go around or even sit around with earplugs or earphones or have to attach a portable device to speakers.

    Again, Favorites is there with a click of the Star that is always at the right bottom. Fill it up.

    TIP: Use it in Landscape. Recommendations almost never come up that way. An alternate way not to see them. I hope Amazon cuts WAY back on that though.

    Or, find other tablets that will give the range of entertainment and quality of sight and sound and interconnectivity and sync\’g and just pay more cash for it.

    The Apple iPad gets Amazon Instant Prime now and they can be heros for not having ads which with their margins makes sense. It\’s a choice. But Apple syncs with Apple and with no other companies\’ devices. Yet, they call Amazon \’closed\’…

    • I agree. I don’t find the ads intrusive at all. So, I I see an ad when I awaken my Fire HD from sleep mode. Not a big deal. I actually like the “customers who . . .” list under the carousel. Then again, I grok that the Fire HD is a subsidized media consumption device, not a blank slate that I can customize to my heart’s content.

      I’m with you on the Favorites: it’s now useful: I can switch from a book or magazine to Wikipedia and then go back to the book. I don’t recall being able to do that before.

      I agree that not including a charging is a penny ante move. The same facts that say not including one isn’t that big a deal — you can buy a generic one for few bucks — also say make Amazon look bad for not including it.

      The complaints about the software and the browser just tickle me. Both are huge improvements over the original Fire. I have a Nexus 7 and Silk doesn’t seem any slower than Chrome on the Nexus or — gasp! — Safari on my son’s iPad.

      I don’t recall an actual Google You Tube app for the original Fire. I could be wrong, If I’m not, blame Google, not Amazon.

      “Extremely easy to make purchases.” Yeah, that’s kind of the point, isn’t it?

      • Roberto,
        Like you I spent an entire day with this (in a lot of enjoyment) without realizing there were ‘Recommendations’ because I was either watching and listening (and there are no ads or recommendations from Amazon while you’re doing that) or I was in between but in Landscape mode where they don’t show up.

        And, right, Amazon is known for 2% margins, making stock-analysis sites very nervous, while Apple is known for 22% margins. It’s our choice which we go with, money upfront to large-margins vendor (and in Apple’s case for a very walled but quite beautiful garden) or subjecting ourselves to marketing where they can.

  5. Like with any new device or OS version, wait for the first update before taking the plunge. At place where I used to work years ago, “let the pioneers take the arrows” was a common phrase.

  6. Take the Amazon.com customer reviews with a grain of salt. they aren’t always referring to the actual product. I saw a 1 star review just based on the fact this person hadn’t received their Kindle yet. Some people just miss the point entirely.

    • Actually for the reviews from 1-star to 4-star I read each one.

      There were very few ones about ‘hasn’t received Kindle yet’. Those weren’t included in the Pros and Cons list. In this case your comment isn’t valid.

      • When you are giving the percentages of reviews (22 of 146 for 15.07%) and some of them have nothing to do with actual product my comment IS valid. Not that I was seeking validation. My point is valid just based on the fact it’s true. Sorry your Majesty.

      • Whatever makes you happy.

      • Not that I care that you know but it does appear that particular review has been removed. I know what I read and I know people leave ‘reviews’ like that all the time. But, what would ‘make me happy’ is to never return to this website. thanks for being a pompous jerk.

      • It would also make me happy.

      • ddh1969,
        Switch11 is the most honest device blogger around, always with interesting analysis. Some will appreciate it, including his giving space to opposing opinions. It’s better to post with the facts as you see them and leave it at that.

  7. I understand some of these comments but people seem to want everything for free. Free devices, free content, wonderful free software, etc. Get Real! All this costs money so you have to pay for it up front for $500-$900 or all along the way with ads, add on chargers etc. As grandma said “there is no free lunch”.

    • I think most people are upset because Amazon did say – Here’s Free Lunch.

      Then when users actually got the Free Lunch, they found out – you MUST first eat a bowl of broccoli and spinach.

      • I agree that Amazon should have been more upfront about the ads. I’m not sure how they could have spun it but they should have tried.

        Not doing so opened the door to the hyperbolic — in my opinion — carping you wrote about. Now people are making it sound as it your book or movie was interrupted, Hulu Plus style, every 10 minutes or so with an ad. I used my Fire HD for seven-plus hours yesterday between reading and watching a video and, apart from the “wake up screen,” the idea that the device was ad-supported never entered my consciousness.

        I realize that I’m probably in a minority about the suggestions underneath the carousel, but as several posters wrote, the only successful tablet maker who doesn’t treat their device as a kind of “loss leader” is Apple. Google isn’t as upfront about it because they lack the ecosystem to do it. Instead, they will probably leverage your data. (My Nexus 7 is already creating Google Now “cards” for me that are, frankly, a bit creepy.)

        Apple would like to charge you a premium and make money on content but when you can sell a phone that cost you $170 or so to make for more than $500 you can afford to be magnanimous towards a company that really isn’t a competitor where it counts most.

      • When they said they want to make the money when you USE it rather than when you buy it (meaning profit focus on the use but a smaller profit on the hardware), they meant when you use it to buy content – that should be clear from a *shopping* company which is all Amazon is, though it entices you to shop with entertainment in return and better prices in general.

        That was key — the admission that they are focusing on making the bigger money from customers BUYING. Not sitting there watching video after video as I do (mostly tv reruns of shows I missed).

        With buying and shopping comes marketing and advertising. Amazon is first and foremost, a store. It’s got better entertainment to entice you in, but they want you in to market to you. That is their sole reason for being.

        Anyone not knowing that should not get a tablet from Amazon.
        They can just pay more and get something devoid of Amazon marketing. Really I mainly rail against the Nexus being seen as ‘more’ because for the $200 it is not, in the many ways I’ve cited.

        But for freedom from Amazon’s marketing, it is ACE. I agree wholly with Roberto. Amazon said and had paperpoint slides to show that it intends to make the money from what you agree to buy once you’re “in the store” but you won’t be buying unless they show you what’s available. .SOME of us like buying our choices from them as a rule, though we shop many stores before we do. But I don’t resent their showing me things though I do want them to make ‘Recommendations’ a setting you can opt into.

        It’s so easy to go to Landscape mode (my normal mode) and not even see this stuff, but then I would have missed ‘Trending’ which has a lot of interesting news I miss while just enjoying passively all the entertainment including music, videos, reading. They choose interesting stuff.

        I can get rid of that as well as ‘Recommendations’ if I’m in portrait mode and seeing them, by pushing Favorites, which brings up everything I added to Favorites (web, reading, apps) taking me to my last use of each site.

        So, I am busily addig a lot of stuff to Favorites.

        Amazon never introduced this as a “Free Lunch” tablet – and their emphasis was exactly the opposite. They said that’s where they make their money – by your using it and that obviously implies your sending money to them, otherwise how can they make money?

        They’re a shopping center. The sooner people *remember* that (and probably choose other tablets if upset with that) the better for them,

        A problem is that they’ve presented such an abundance of good entertainment for not-much money, hoping you’ll continue to buy more, that people forget it’s a store where the owners want you to spend money, and like any real store (book store or Target etc) they’ll have signs all over about what is available here or there.

        It’s sophisticated in that they make people who don’t know better think it’s easy to just make software that lets you do this and enjoy the same entertainment on all your other non-Amazon devices and sync it all. It’s not easy. Name another entity that does it. They have a lot of value-added info features too, including X-ray.

        They’ve put together a more fun arcade for the usual things we do but it costs in labor and in web services. And the costs have to be recoup’d.

  8. [...] Fire HD on Amazon’s site. An excellent job of consolidating the reviews can be found at this site. The interesting thing about these reviews are some of the major negatives about the Fire HD. Some [...]

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