Kindle vs Sony is becoming an afterthought

After the new Kindle 3 and Kindle WiFi came out it became apparent that Nook 2 and the new Sony Readers would have to make some significant advances to keep up.

A much improved Kindle 3 meant Sony and B&N had their work cut out

Here’s a short list of Kindle 3 features that illustrates why Kindle was threatening to leave Nook and Sony Reader behind permanently – 4 weeks battery life with wireless off, faster page turns, Voice Guide, WiFi (Kindle 3 has both WiFi and 3G), free Internet with Kindle 3, better browser, more compact and lighter Kindle, low $139 and $189 prices.

In parallel Amazon has been improving its WhisperNet service, adding Kindle Apps for various platforms, and adding books to the Kindle Store. It has also released two free Kindle Apps and the first paid Kindle app.

B&N needed a very solid Nook 2 and Sony needed a very solid group of Sony Readers and a much better Sony Reader Store to compete. We don’t know what B&N’s answer is but we do know Sony’s answer – Sony 350 and Sony 650.

Sony hasn’t really delivered

Here’s my conclusion from my Kindle 3 vs Sony 350 post -

Sony comes very, very close and if not for its stubborn refusal to add wireless support and compete on price it would have had the better eReader.

As it stands, the Kindle 3 is a clear winner unless you need a touch screen or ePub support or must have an eReader that fits in your pant pocket.

Here’s Engadget’s wrap-up from their Sony 350 review -

The way we see it there are two main reasons you’d buy the $179.99 e-reader over the Amazon Kindle or Barnes & Noble Nook: its incredibly responsive touchscreen navigation and extreme portability.

However, if those don’t appeal to you or you really just prefer having a larger selection of e-books and the ability to buy books over the air via WiFi or 3G, it’s obvious that Amazon’s $139 Kindle with WiFi or its $189 3G version would be a better choice.

Notice the similarities – Touchscreen navigation, ePub support (including support for library books), and extreme portability are the only qualifiers. In every other case Kindle 3 wins.

Sony 350 and 650 have failed to re-ignite the Kindle vs Sony debate

Just to paint a picture of how lopsided the competition is let’s contrast the main advantages -

  1. Sony 350 and Sony 650 – very cute, 350 is super light and compact, ePub and library book support, touch screen, custom screensavers. Better PDF support too – slightly better.
  2. Kindle WiFi and Kindle 3 – much lower price ($139 vs $179, $189 vs $229), better battery life, much better store (book range and price), wireless support and browser, 60 second downloads, infrastructure, Kindle App Store, Text to Speech, Accessibility, and lots of small things.

Even if you’re pro-Sony and hate Amazon you have to admit Sony has dropped the ball. It hasn’t won back the #1 spot, it hasn’t won back the #2 spot, and it might end up an afterthought.

Engadget has been less generous than me and it’s right – There just aren’t that many reasons to buy a Sony Reader. If you really must have ePub support then Nook is a better choice as it offers a much better ebook store.

The gap is going to get bigger

B&N and Amazon are improving their infrastructure and adding apps for additional platforms and improving their stores and offering new features. Sony is offering hollow words – that they will fight on quality.

How can you fight on quality if you aren’t matching your competitors’ features?

No matter how shiny the aluminium of your Sony Reader’s casing it doesn’t make up for high book prices and low selection and the lack of wireless downloads and the lack of Internet browsing for reference.

Sony just isn’t keeping up.

The wild card is the Kindle App Store – It will mean that in addition to Amazon we will have lots of developers adding features to the Kindle 3 and 2 and WiFi. We only need a handful of developers to make killer apps and suddenly Sony is even further behind.

Perhaps most worrying for Sony is that people don’t seem to care about it any more.

Where are the Sony Reader Reviews?

Engadget posted its review on October 8th, 2010. That’s nearly a month after my review and 22 days after the official release date of September 16th, 2010. PC World posted on October 5th. CNet posted its review on September 26th and gave it 6 on features and 7 on performance.

Did Sony not hand out review units? Did people not want to review them? Why is everyone waiting 2 to 3 weeks before reviewing the Sony 350?

There were no ‘exclusives’ and there were no release day reviews. There was no big flurry of reviews and press coverage like we had for Nook and for Kindle 3.

Sony’s release strategy is a mess – either because they don’t care or because people and the Press no longer care. Even Nook WiFi got more press buzz than the new Sony Readers.

Think about that – Nook WiFi got more press coverage than the new generation of Sony Readers. That’s what Sony Reader has devolved too – People don’t even care enough to review the new Sony Readers or write about them when they are first launched.

It makes you wonder if everyone is gradually forgetting that Sony Readers exist. Sony can keep hiding behind excuses like ‘we are focused on international markets’ or ‘we only care about quality’. The truth is that if you release in the biggest eReader market and the Press won’t even review your devices you are just a few steps away from becoming invisible and irrelevant.  

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